Thursday, September 30, 2004


I'D LIKE TO SEE HIM DEBATE KERRY

Prof. Hanson was asked by the NYTimes to provide a list of questions to ask Kerry, which (since there are only three) I include in their entirety below:

How might you explain the apparent abrupt change in policy of Libya; the unexpected removal of Abdul Qadeer Khan, the father of Pakistan's atomic bomb; and the about-face in Saudi Arabia - and what precise plans do you have to induce similar such positive changes in attitude in Iran, Lebanon and Syria?

In January, you promised to be a president who "reduces the overall need for deployment of American forces in the globe - and I mean North Korea, Germany and the rest of the world." More recently, however, you have chastised President Bush for saying that he will do precisely that, suggesting that his "hastily announced plan raises more doubts about our intentions and our commitments than it provides real answers." As president, would you send those departing American troops back into Germany and on the Korean Peninsula to restore previous levels? And if not, why?

President Bush was the first American president to isolate Yasir Arafat. Do you agree with the president's radical step of ostracizing Mr. Arafat? If so, would you also ensure that he is no longer a party to the Middle East peace negotiations?


ELECTION OFFICIALS WITH A SENSE OF HUMOR

In Ohio, many voters will use a punch card system, just like Florida used in 2000. In anticipation of criticism, local voting officials are running TV ads to remind people how to use the system and especially how to avoid "those Florida hanging chads."


TREACHERY

How did Saddam become Saddam? Should we believe Libya? Has the UN helped or hurt the spread of WMD?

Bill Gertz has written a book called Treachery, which is excerpted here, here and here.


EARTH TO DEMOCRATS

Glenn Reynolds has your number, but you may not like it.


I'M NOT AS SYMPATHETIC AS ARNOLD

No, not that Arnold.

This Arnold. You know: Kling. Arnold Kling.

Money quotes:

In the 1950's, the Republican right wing went insane over the fact that a Communist revolution took place in China. They charged the Democratic Party and the State Department with "losing" China. They made it politically impossible for the United States to even recognize China until the 1970's. For more than two decades, we treated the government of China as illegitimate and tried to act as if the country did not exist.

In similar fashion, the Democratic left wing has gone berserk over the 2000 election. They treat the Bush Administration as illegitimate. They wallow in paranoia and conspiracy theories.


I'M JOHN KERRY AND I APPROVE THIS MESSAGE

I hear that's the new tagline for anything said by Dan Rather.


WHAT ABOUT FLORIDA?

We've all heard about the "fraud" by Republicans in Florida. And the pronoucement by the "Peanut Farmer" that Florida was no better than a banana republic. So that must mean the Democrats are squeaky clean.

Wait. They're not?


STATING THE OBVIOUS

Good article from the Jerusalem Post about the UN and its inability to cope with the concept of terrorism. At the root of the problem -- they can't seem to define it. And, after all, if you can't define a problem, how can you solve it?

If the UN was a commercial enterprise it would have filed for bankruptcy many years ago. It's painfully obvious that the UN is no longer performing per its charter. Someone needs to have the stones to stand up and say either it gets fixed or the US is evicting it from Manhattan. It belongs in Belgium anyway; might as well do it now.


THEY'D RATHER HAVE THEIR HEADS SAWED OFF

David Warren has an excellent post today about this evening's debate.

Money quote about liberal Dems:

In the slightly retouched words of my chief Texas correspondent, who was not being entirely facetious, "There are too many Democrats on the left who would rather have their heads sawed off by a Jihadi than admit they've been wrong about everything." And my own sense is that more than a third of the U.S. electorate would vote Kerry against Bush, even if, during the debates, Mr. Kerry's eyes light up green and his head starts rotating. This, alas, has become the "Democrat base".

And he ends with:

The reader would be right to read into this grand seismic events. The U.S. public is splitting along religious lines, not between one confession and another, but more vastly between the religious faithful, and the rest. Messrs. Bush and Kerry have, largely without intending, become surrogates in a battle between alternative Americas, and for each side, in the coming election, almost everything is at stake.

True.

Wednesday, September 29, 2004


FOR JUST ONE DAY

I'm not going to think about Iraq or John Kerry.

I'm only going to think about this.

I watched the webcast of most of the flight and it was scary, but it must have been a hoot. Wish I could afford one of these.


HAMAS TO ARAFAT -- IT'S TIME TO GO


This is getting interesting.

First, Israel takes apart Hamas from the top down.

Next, Hamas says Arafat must go.

Cool.

Tuesday, September 28, 2004


SHAME ON HIM!

Will someone please tell Jimmy Carter to go back to Plains and grow peanuts.


MORE SIGNS OF KERRY'S DESPERATION

The list is growing longer (gee, maybe Kerry really is Pinnochio, except his face gets longer with each lie?).

Now Kerry is saying there is a "secret plan that would hurt milk producers after the election."

Where did he say this? In Wisconsin, of course.

Seems his new strategy is to have a focused message to each group he speaks to that says the President is out to get them. Yeah, that'll work.


HITCHENS ON DEMOCRATS' INSANITY

Christopher Hitchens doesn't write enough. Maybe once or twice a month he sits down and comments on what's happening in the world.

Yesterday, he decided it was time to call a spade a spade. Sparked by Teresa's insane comment that she wouldn't be surprised if Osama "appeared in the next month", Hitchens went off:

What will it take to convince these people that this is not a year, or a time, to be dicking around? Americans are patrolling a front line in Afghanistan, where it would be impossible with 10 times the troop strength to protect all potential voters on Oct. 9 from Taliban/al-Qaida murder and sabotage. We are invited to believe that these hard-pressed soldiers of ours take time off to keep Osama Bin Laden in a secret cave, ready to uncork him when they get a call from Karl Rove? For shame.


THE WOMEN IN HIS LIFE

We all know about Teresa. How about Kerry's sister? You know, the one who's been traveling all over the world saying how unsafe the US has made the world to live in.

Don't you think Kerry would be better off if he told these two to sit down and shut up?


KILLING OSAMA

Do you think killing Osama is a good thing? Or would you rather see him captured alive and be subjected to trial?

Many would like to see his head on a stake, but some believe that if you kill him, he may become larger in death than he was in life.

Monday, September 27, 2004


THE SHOE'S ON THE OTHER FOOT

Around the world, many world leaders and politicians are at constant risk of being attacked by terrorists.

So, isn't it ironic that in Syria, where he expected to be safe, a leader of Hamas was killed by a car bomb.

MEDIA BIAS AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT

Whether they were first or not is not the point, but the Power Line blog was generally credited for raising the "fraudulent documents" question that resulted in Rathergate.

They are now on a tear after media sources that keep tossing in bias whenever they feel like it.

For instance, over the weekend the AP ran a story that was headlined "Bush Twists Kerry's Words on Iraq". Power Line and one of its readers went after the AP and forced them to change the headline to "Bush, Kerry, Twisting Each Other's Words".

Small victory, but a sign that the media has heard the footsteps. Don't be afraid to send an e-mail or call a media source that writes an article or airs a story you think is bias. It appears they are finally listening.



TEXANS FOR TRUTH?

How about Texans Escaped from Reality?

Check this out. The same group who went after Bush's Air Guard performance is now demanding he release all his military records.

Interesting. However, maybe they should ask their guy - Lt. John Kerry - to release his records. He supposedly told Tim Russert he would sign the form that would authorize release of his records but, so far, he hasn't done so.

If I were Kerry, I'd pay these guys to shut up. So far, they've cost him 3-7 point (depending on which one) in the polls. Care to double down?


INDIAN COUNTRY

By ROBERT D. KAPLAN
September 21, 2004

An overlooked truth about the war on terrorism, and the war in Iraq in particular, is that they both arrived too soon for the American military: before it had adequately transformed itself from a dinosauric, Industrial Age beast to a light and lethal instrument skilled in guerrilla warfare, attuned to the local environment in the way of the 19th-century Apaches. My mention of the Apaches is deliberate. For in a world where mass infantry invasions are becoming politically and diplomatically prohibitive -- even as dirty little struggles proliferate, featuring small clusters of combatants hiding out in Third World slums, deserts and jungles -- the American military is back to the days of fighting the Indians.

The red Indian metaphor is one with which a liberal policy nomenklatura may be uncomfortable, but Army and Marine field officers have embraced it because it captures perfectly the combat challenge of the early 21st century. But they don't mean it as a slight against the Native North Americans. The fact that radio call signs so often employ Indian names is an indication of the troops' reverence for them. The range of Indian groups, numbering in their hundreds, that the U.S. Cavalry and Dragoons had to confront was no less varied than that of the warring ethnic and religious militias spread throughout Eurasia, Africa and South America in the early 21st century. When the Cavalry invested Indian encampments, they periodically encountered warrior braves beside women and children, much like Fallujah. Though most Cavalry officers tried to spare the lives of noncombatants, inevitable civilian casualties raised howls of protest among humanitarians back East, who, because of the dissolution of the conscript army at the end of the Civil War, no longer empathized with a volunteer force beyond the Mississippi that was drawn from the working classes.

Indian Country has been expanding in recent years because of the security vacuum created by the collapse of traditional dictatorships and the emergence of new democracies -- whose short-term institutional weaknesses provide whole new oxygen systems for terrorists. Iraq is but a microcosm of the earth in this regard. To wit, the upsurge of terrorism in the vast archipelago of Indonesia, the southern Philippines and parts of Malaysia is a direct result of the anarchy unleashed by the passing of military regimes. Likewise, though many do not realize it, a more liberalized Middle East will initially see greater rather than lesser opportunities for terrorists. As the British diplomatist Harold Nicolson understood, public opinion is not necessarily enlightened merely because it has been suppressed.

I am not suggesting that we should not work for free societies. I am suggesting that our military-security establishment be under no illusions regarding the immediate consequences.
In Indian Country, it is not only the outbreak of a full-scale insurgency that must be avoided, but the arrival in significant numbers of the global media. It would be difficult to fight more cleanly than the Marines did in Fallujah. Yet that still wasn't a high enough standard for independent foreign television voices such as al-Jazeera, whose very existence owes itself to the creeping liberalization in the Arab world for which the U.S. is largely responsible. For the more we succeed in democratizing the world, not only the more security vacuums that will be created, but the more constrained by newly independent local medias our military will be in responding to those vacuums. From a field officer's point of view, an age of democracy means an age of restrictive ROEs (rules of engagement).

The American military now has the most thankless task of any military in the history of warfare: to provide the security armature for an emerging global civilization that, the more it matures -- with its own mass media and governing structures -- the less credit and sympathy it will grant to the very troops who have risked and, indeed, given their lives for it. And as the thunderous roar of a global cosmopolitan press corps gets louder -- demanding the application of abstract principles of universal justice that, sadly, are often neither practical nor necessarily synonymous with American national interest -- the smaller and more low-key our deployments will become. In the future, military glory will come down to shadowy, page-three skirmishes around the globe, that the armed services will quietly celebrate among their own subculture.
The goal will be suppression of terrorist networks through the training of -- and combined operations with -- indigenous troops. That is why the Pan-Sahel Initiative in Africa, in which Marines and Army Special Forces have been training local militaries in Mauritania, Mali, Niger and Chad, in order to counter al-Qaeda infiltration of sub-Saharan Africa, is a surer paradigm for the American imperial future than anything occurring in Iraq or Afghanistan.

In months of travels with the American military, I have learned that the smaller the American footprint and the less notice it draws from the international media, the more effective is the operation. One good soldier-diplomat in a place like Mongolia can accomplish miracles. A few hundred Green Berets in Colombia and the Philippines can be adequate force multipliers. Ten thousand troops, as in Afghanistan, can tread water. And 130,000, as in Iraq, constitutes a mess that nobody wants to repeat -- regardless of one's position on the war.

In Indian Country, the smaller the tactical unit, the more forward deployed it is, and the more autonomy it enjoys from the chain of command, the more that can be accomplished. It simply isn't enough for units to be out all day in Iraqi towns and villages engaged in presence patrols and civil-affairs projects: A successful FOB (forward operating base) is a nearly empty one, in which most units are living beyond the base perimeters among the indigenous population for days or weeks at a time.

Much can be learned from our ongoing Horn of Africa experience. From a base in Djibouti, small U.S. military teams have been quietly scouring an anarchic region that because of an Islamic setting offers al Qaeda cultural access. "Who needs meetings in Washington," one Army major told me. "Guys in the field will figure out what to do. I took 10 guys to explore eastern Ethiopia. In every town people wanted a bigger American presence. They know we're here, they want to see what we can do for them." The new economy-of-force paradigm being pioneered in the Horn borrows more from the Lewis and Clark expedition than from the major conflicts of the 20th century.

In Indian Country, as one general officer told me, "you want to whack bad guys quietly and cover your tracks with humanitarian-aid projects." Because of the need for simultaneous military, relief and diplomatic operations, our greatest enemy is the size, rigidity and artificial boundaries of the Washington bureaucracy. Thus, the next administration, be it Republican or Democrat, will have to advance the merging of the departments of State and Defense as never before; or risk failure. A strong secretary of state who rides roughshod over a less dynamic defense secretary -- as a Democratic administration appears to promise -- will only compound the problems created by the Bush administration, in which the opposite has occurred. The two secretaries must work in unison, planting significant numbers of State Department personnel inside the military's war fighting commands, and defense personnel inside a modernized Agency for International Development.

The Plains Indians were ultimately vanquished not because the U.S. Army adapted to the challenge of an unconventional enemy. It never did. In fact, the Army never learned the lesson that small units of foot soldiers were more effective against the Indians than large mounted regiments burdened by the need to carry forage for horses: whose contemporary equivalent are convoys of humvees bristling with weaponry that are easily immobilized by an improvised bicycle bomb planted by a lone insurgent. Had it not been for a deluge of settlers aided by the railroad, security never would have been brought to the Old West.

Now there are no new settlers to help us, nor their equivalent in any form. To help secure a more liberal global environment, American ground troops are going to have to learn to be more like Apaches.


I THOUGHT IT WOULD TAKE LONGER THAN THIS

Last Thursday, I said (about the Kerry campaign):

Who knows, maybe they'll roll out the anti-Goldwater commercial -- you know the one with the mushroom cloud -- but it will be updated and the cloud will rise over Manhattan. You know, keep Bush in office and you might see the world's first briefcase nuke in action.

And today I read this.


MESSAGE TO JOHN KERRY

John, even if you could turn the US into France, we still won't be safe.


HERE'S A GOOD EXAMPLE

Of wild-eyed neo-liberal extremism.

How do you combat terror within the US? Wouldn't you like to use all the technological capabilities we have to identify terror suspects. Some examples:

There are reports potential terroists are targeting the US-Mexican border as a "soft" entry point into the US. We don't have 500,000 Border patrol guards every 100 yards along the border, so wouldn't you want to use every means to see who might be stolling across?

When there are big-city visits by the President, Vice President and others, how do you do a thorough scan of every rooftop to make sure a sniper isn't up there?

You get the idea.


IT COMES DOWN TO THIS QUESTION

Who will be the first to perish, in a "nuclear sea of fire"?

Friday, September 24, 2004

V.D.H. CHIMES IN ON RATHERGATE

Prof. Hanson sets things straight.



IRAQ = GUADALCANAL??

One guy thinks so.



EARTH TO TERESA!!!

Oy! Talk about a woman out of touch.

Maria Teresa Thierstein Simoes-Ferreira Heinz Kerry is even more out of control than her husband. I'm sure she believes that Osama is in a underground prison somewhere in the world and will be hauled out a few days before the election.

Of course, this comes from a woman whose legal name is still Teresa Heinz. Or, as she says:

''My legal name is still Teresa Heinz. Teresa Heinz Kerry is my name . . . for politics. Just so people don't ask me questions about so and so is so and so's wife or this and that. Teresa Heinz is what I've been all my growing-up life, adult life, more than any other name. And it's the name of my boys, you know? . . . So that's my legal name and that's my office name, my Pittsburgh name.''

My office name? My Pittsburgh name?

(Cue Twilight Zone theme.)



SYRIA -- WMDs, LEBANON AND THE U.N.

An interesting post about Syria, including unsubstantiated claims from a Syrian journalist that Saddam's WMDs were removed to Syria in ambulances a month before the US invasion.



CONSPIRACY THEORIES

Read this post about the chronology of "Rathergate" and ask yourself the same question that is the title of the post -- Who Knew?



Thursday, September 23, 2004

THE GEEKS MIGHT HAVE THE ANSWER

As the world becomes more networked, and weapons systems adapt and improve, it's encouraging to hear that there is technology other than JDAMs and UAVs that may be more important.



IS IT POSSIBLE THEY'RE "GETTING IT"?

Germany just prohibited an Islamic group from holding a conference in Berlin.

Do you think? Is it possible?

One thing for sure, this would never have happened in France.


DID HE REALLY SAY THAT?

I'm sure you've probably heard by now that Yusuf Islam (f/k/a Cat Stevens) wasn't allowed to enter the US yesterday. His name was on a "no-fly" list.

But Asa Hutchinson said "Right now, under the rules we get the information (about passenger boardings) at Homeland Security, I believe it's 15 minutes after the plane takes off."

WTF???

Isn't that a tad late if there are real bad guys on board?



KERRY STILL CLUELESS IN AUTO-LAND

Kerry, I assume, is still leading the polls in Michigan. He certainly has the labor vote behind him.

But you think he would go out of his way to sit down with the manufacturers (whom he wants to keep jobs in the US).

But no-o-o-o-o-o-o.



IT SOUNDS LIKE IT'S OVER

If you look back a couple of months, everyone was asking when Kerry would wake up. Beginning with the Dem Convention, he "reported for duty" and became "Lt. Kerry, War Hero", only to have the Swift Boat Vets torpedo his dinghy. So he retreated to his tent.

Weeks later, the creative response to credible evidence Kerry's Viet Am adventure wasn't exactly a precursor to Apocalypse Now, was a criticism of Bush's Air Guard record -- a dead horse that had been shot two or three times before. Miraculously, CBS leapt to the defense and ran with a dubious story supported by crude attempts to create "smoking guns" that would, once and for all, confirm what we already know -- in the 1970's, 'W' was a fuck-up. Something he freely admits.

To the embarrassment of all, the "pajamaheddin" -- that unwashed and uncontrolled mob known as bloggers -- exposed CBS documents as the journalistic equivalent of the Shroud of Turin. So Kerry and company had to back off on that one.

So what now?

In the past couple of days, Kerry has apparently decided to go with his version of suicide bombing.

First, he's uttering completely hypothetical and inflammatory allegations -- e.g., it's likely that Bush will re-introduce the military draft. I suspect there will be other airy-fairy pronouncements before election day. Who knows, maybe they'll roll out the anti-Goldwater commercial -- you know the one with the mushroom cloud -- but it will be updated and the cloud will rise over Manhattan. You know, keep Bush in office and you might see the world's first briefcase nuke in action.

Finally (and irretrievably), Kerry has re-morphed as "Young John Kerry" and his words are becoming more and more anti-war, more and more like they could be coming from the mouth of Howard Dean, a guy even the Democrats rejected. More and more dangerous for America.

It's one thing for a young, idealistic, pseudo-intellectual preppy to be anti-war in 1972. It's quite another for the Democratic nominee for President to utter anti-war statements when American soldiers and Marines are dying at the hands of an enemy.

The only thing that Kerry could possibly do worse would be to begin to compare Bush to Hitler.

It's over.



ANOTHER GOOD REASON TO LOSE WEIGHT

Yeah, yeah, we all know about high-protein, low-carb, organic, low cholesterol, high-fiber diets and the additive benefit of exercise. All things which won't hurt you.

Here's another factoid about fat and why it will hurt you.


I'VE SAID IT BEFORE . . .

. . . I'll say it again.

Any Jew who supports Kerry over Bush because Bush . . .

1) Is a fundamentalist Christian maniac.
2) Is a southern redneck.
3) Illegally invaded Iraq.
4) Stole the election from that nice boy Al Gore.
5) Etc.

. . . ignores one gigantic truth:

Kerry is no friend to Israel.


I HOPE THEY'RE RIGHT

Strategy Page declares the war against al Qaeda in Iraq is over.



FINALLY, SOMETHING SERIOUS TO TALK ABOUT

Here's a political question that has nothing to do with whether you're a Republican or a Democrat.

Should registered voters who are also afflicted with Alzheimers or other types of acute dementia be allowed to vote?

My two cents? Voting is a privilege, not a right. As with other privileges in our society, it can be permanently or temprorarily suspended for a variety of reasons. If it can be shown that an individual is incapable of forming a coherent thought, I'd say they shouldn't be allowed to vote. Since it looks like (if you read the story) these folks are "assisted" by someone else, what you really have is a situation where their "assistants" get to vote twice. Is that right? Again, I'd say no.


THE LARGEST MUSLIM COUNTRY IN THE WORLD

... has a new President. Who is he?

It sounds like his election is going to be bad news for the jihadis.


I WAS WRONG

When's the last time you heard that?

When, what, why?

A few days ago I said Dan Rather should go -- resign, be terminated, etc.

Now, I realize it's much more fun for him to have to stay around for awhile and become totally irrelevant. Who knows, maybe one of these days he'll show up to do the news, completely lose it, and do a Howard Beale.

Yeah, I know. Cruel and nasty.

Actually, I'd settle for this.


WHICH CONSPIRACY THEORY DO YOU BELIEVE?

Now that Rathergate is off-boil (at least for awhile), do you believe it was all orchestrated by:

a) The Republicans, to embarrass the Democrats, once it was shown to be bogus.

b) The Democratics, to embarrass the President.

The American Thinker reports -- you decide.


Wednesday, September 22, 2004

THERE AREN'T ANY NUANCES HERE

Zev Chafets' op-ed in the Daily News minces no words:

Only about 24 hours and 40-odd blocks separated the speeches of John Kerry and George Bush in New York this week. But the distance between them could scarcely have been greater. Not since the Democratic debacle of 1972 have two presidential candidates stood so far apart.

UH, WHAT???

This one sets new standards for insanity. Snippets:

The crux of the plan is the creation of a business district -- dubbed African Town -- that would be funded in part with city money and made up of black-owned businesses catering to a black clientele.

A majority of the Detroit City Council wants to implement an economic development plan it commissioned for $112,000 that preaches racial isolation and rails against immigration in its bid to gain economic success for poor blacks.

(I)mmigrants from Mexico, Asia and the Middle East are stealing resources, jobs and other opportunities from blacks and calls on city leaders to stop the economic shift.

They voted in July to begin implementing parts of Anderson's plan, including a resolution that designates blacks, who make up 83 percent of Detroit's population, as the "majority minority" group and another that creates a development corporation that would operate as a loan fund exclusively for black entrepreneurs.


Who could read this and keep from either laughing or crying, or both.


THERE AREN'T ANY NUANCES HERE

Zev Chafets' op-ed in the Daily News minces no words:

Only about 24 hours and 40-odd blocks separated the speeches of John Kerry and George Bush in New York this week. But the distance between them could scarcely have been greater. Not since the Democratic debacle of 1972 have two presidential candidates stood so far apart.

MS. SCAPEGOAT

Circling the wagons at CBS, it appears they are slowly drawing and quartering Mary Mapes, the producer of the "Bush Air National Guard" story.

It seems fairly clear that they are protecting their severely damaged franchise (a/k/a Dan Rather) by making it look like Mapes was the bad guy.


IRAN HAS NEVER BEEN AS BAD AS IRAQ UNDER SADDAM

I'd bet most people would agree with that statement. And they'd be wrong.

Where was the world when these atrocities were committed?


ANOTHER ZINGER FROM STEYN

You gotta love Mark Steyn. It isn't just the wit combined with sarcasm, it's the fun you know he has writing this stuff.

Today, he writes on the Kerry campaign. A snippet:

If Karl Rove had labored for a decade to produce a walking parody of the contemporary Democratic Party’s remoteness, condescension, sense of entitlement, public evasiveness and tortured relationship with military matters, he couldn’t have improved on John F Kerry.


Tuesday, September 21, 2004

HIS FRIENDS ARE RESTLESS

The New Republic is an avowed liberal-leaning publication, which makes this article all the more interesting.

I'm seeing more and "Moore" of this type of article. Pun intended -- even Michael Moore wrote a whining rant at Democrats who are losing hope about Kerry, essentially calling Kerry flawed but still a better choice than Bush.


SEN. KERRY, DO YOU REALLY WANT THE FRENCH IN IRAQ?

Read this before you answer.


IF THIS WAS AN OFF-YEAR SENATORIAL CAMPAIGN

The FBI would be investigating this case very closely. Using fraudulent documents to affect an election is a federal crime.

If the DNC (or any of their operatives) was event partly involved in this, they should be prosecuted.

If I were Bush, I'd wait until after the election and I would go after them.


RATHER STILL HASN'T COME CLEAN

Wait, I thought he apologized yesterday? For the most recent bogus story, true.

He has yet to apologize for the even worse fabrications used in his 1982 farce about purported atrocities committed in Viet Nam.

I guess the new name for CBS should be "See B. S.".


MY SECOND FAVORITE HEADLINE

"Man Telephones Own Funeral"

My favorite? It was either the New York Daily News or the New York Post:

"Headless Body in Topless Bar"

KERRY CONNECTED TO RATHERGATE?

I've read it here and there that the connections between Kerry's campaign and the chief accuser (a/k/a fraudulent document guy) are coming to light.

What was Kerry's involvement? Don't know.

But his best defense is "I in no way have had any contact with my campaign staff." Probably the truth.


Monday, September 20, 2004

REUTERS = ENEMY

What's in a word? OK, I've beaten this horse before, but Reuters has stepped out and effectively said it will not use the word "terrorist".

Kudos to Can West for calling a terrorist a terrorist.


GEE, SURPRISE -- CBS APOLOGIZES

Sensing the shitstorm of all shitstorms had just given them the ultimate "brown helmet", CBS now admits it was duped.

Sorry -- not good enough. Since they were told by document experts the documents were questionable before they ran with their story, they still have a massive ethical problem. Until they clean house (translation: fire everyone who voted to go with the story), their reputation is toast.


DO YOU THINK???

William Safire offers this constructive advice to Kerry . . . and Kerry responds.


KERRY CAMPAIGN UNDERMINING WAR IN IRAQ

It's not what you think. It's worse.

Kerry's sister, on a trip to Australia, has told Australians their support in Iraq has made them a target for terrorists.

Is this what Kerry means when he says he'll be much better at building coalitions than Bush?


HAS ISRAEL WON ITS WAR AGAINST TERROR?

They report . . . you decide. (Registration required to view article.)


Thursday, September 16, 2004

FAKE, BUT ACCURATE

There you have it, the new standard for mainstream journalism.


MULLAHS WITH NUKES

What's happening in Iraq is just a little street fight, compared to what the world would be like if Iran had nukes.

The UN won't do anything, so who will?


YEEOUCH!

I must admit I've questioned the overused word "forgery" these past few days. Seemed a little off-base. You think of signatures being forged, but not documents. Documents are "fraudulently prepared", not forged, right? Well, maybe not.

I found this article to be compelling, especially the part that says:

Forgery of a federal document and of a federal official’s signature are both potential criminal matters. People could end up in jail. CBS’s parent Viacom is the license holder for numerous large market television and radio stations, licenses collectively worth billions of dollars. When Aerojet General Corporation was convicted of unrelated criminal offenses, the FCC stripped it of a Boston television station license worth hundreds of millions of dollars. CBS’s licenses in most of the nation’s top television markets are worth far, far more, and could potentially be taken away. Even worse, if CBS turns out to have received the forgeries from a party related to the Kerry campaign or the Democratic Party, it faces political liability for conspiracy to alter a presidential election by fraud. The firestorm which would follow would be unprecedented. Watergate would be small potatoes, comparatively.

Though there would be a political shitstorm if Justice decided to look into the criminality of CBS' actions, it would sure be interesting, no?


LET THEM GO NAKED FOR AWHILE?

Is this a modern day version of "let them eat cake"?

Teresa definitely wins the Martha Stewart award for dimbulb comments by a "public" figure.


FILTER THIS!

What I find most arrogant about the Dan Rathers and Paul Krugmans of the world is their overwhelming sense of moral superiority. It's the standard, elitist, "you can't possibly be smart enough to process primary information" bullshit that is now costing them dearly.

I've been infuriated for years at broadcast "journalists" who would spend 30 minutes telling me what someone had just said (e.g., Presidential address). Like I didn't listen?

Print and investigative journalists have always prided themselves on their "research" and "interview" skills. Of course, they have the editorial privilege, which allows them to again decide what I should hear.

With "Rathergate", mainstream media is getting a lesson, and it's a painful one. We're saying to them that we don't really trust them to filter information anymore. To earn credibility, give us the information and let us filter it. And if you won't give it to us, we'll find a way to get it ourselves. Once we do that, we really don't need you anymore.


Wednesday, September 15, 2004

KERRY'S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE

Here's a great summation of Kerry's Viet Nam tour and questions that have arisen since.


MENTALLY DEFICIENT

If that were a Jeopardy answer, the question would be: How would you describe Martha Stewart?

A sample of "Marthaspeak":

"I could do it," she said in an interview with ABC. "I'm a really good camper. ... There are many, many good people who have gone to prison. Look at Nelson Mandela."

Oh. My. God. The woman's (as the Brits would say) starkers.


PILING ON

I love it.

ABC News seems to be smelling blood. They're the bottom of the food chain in ratings amongst the networks, so what have they got to lose?

Anyway, here's their latest on "Rathergate". As I suspected would happen, any real vetting of this story is going to discover that Rather was far more interested in the possibility of embarrassing Bush than he was discovering the truth. Unsubstantiated staff comments leaking out of CBS have said he just didn't want to hear any doubts about the authenticity of the documents.

I'd hoped for an on air apology. Maybe I shot too low. How about an on-air resignation? That would up Rather's ratings!

Friday, September 10, 2004

KERRY'S CAMP IN PANIC MODE

It appears Kerry's marketing staff have decided to only advertise in 14 states, 9 of which Gore won in 2000.

This speaks to, as this post suggests, threading a small needle. Or as it suggests:

This is a thread the needle strategy with almost 8 weeks to go. We are seeing shades of the 1988 Dukakais campaign at work, a repeat of the collapse mode. Nominating a liberal from Massachusetts with no national appeal, who also happens to be personally unlikable and dull, didn’t work the first time out. The Democrats projected their own obsessive hatred of Bush onto the national electorate, and were stupid enough to believe that they could sell Kerry as a savior.

THE BALL IS STILL IN OUR COURT

And we're still getting no help.

When will the rest of the "free" World wake up? Or will they just die asleep?


BUSH WINS

So says David Warren.

Money quote:

Mr. Bush is the candidate for people who want America strong -- and these include many not themselves American. Mr. Kerry is for those who think the world would be better if America were weaker -- including a large constituency in the U.S. itself.

It follows that Mr. Bush is hated, passionately, not for himself alone, but because he has, by accident of history, come to symbolize everything anyone ever disliked about the USA. Given a choice even between Jihadis and Marines, they will still "blame America" for as long as possible.



NOT THAT IT MATTERS

I think Bush has it pretty well sewed up.

The latest media frenzy over his Air Guard service may in fact put him over the top if the purported "smoking gun" documents are proven fraudulent. I'd pay money to see Rather apologize.

But even if they're true, it's a bunch of bullshit. When I was in the Air Guard, I missed plenty of meetings and training. At that time it didn't matter since most units were way overstaffed and more than half the aircraft were grounded due to lack of parts.

For more background on this whole thing, read this.


KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK GUYS!

The Germans are really patting themselves on the back for all the good work they've done in the Middle East. Their appeasement of the Islamists has resulted in wonderful progress on the human rights front. An example:

(A) success of the "European-Iranian human rights dialog" (is) that a 16-year-old girl will not be stoned to death, but rather hanged. Her "crime": pre-marital sex. (Also), "the official age of marriage... after delicate negotiations between reformers and conservatives, was raised from 9 to 10 years".

Idiots.


Thursday, September 09, 2004

NAMING NAMES

Roger Simon bemoans the Beslan massacre by saying:

9/11 didn't scare me. The Atocha railroad station didn't scare me. The horrors of the Russian schoolhouse didn't even scare me. It was the reaction by many in Europe and in our media to what happened in that school that has me terrified.


TOMAYTO TOMAHTO, WHAT'S IN A NAME?

A lot.

What would you call the terrorists who murdered hundreds of Ossetians in Beslan?

If you're a journalist, you probably didn't chose the word terrorist. Why not?


MICKEY'S HAD IT WITH KERRY

Mickey Kaus ( a confessed liberal) has had it with Kerry.

Money quote:

The nation is trying to figure out how to fight global terrorism and he's talking about having "not just a Department of Health and Human Services, but a Department of Wellness." How about a Department of F***ing Perspective?


Wednesday, September 08, 2004

FLIP-FLOP? OR DUMB AND DUMBER?

Another gem from Kerry. He's said he's a hunter. He accepted a shotgun from a group in West Virginia on Monday.

The irony is legislation he's backed would ban the gun he received (a semi-automatic shotgun).

Let's just call this one a flop.



TIPPING POINT OR CROSSROADS?

What will Russia's strategic response be to the massacre of its children? What can its reponse be? Wretchard has written an excellent piece addressing this, which I include in its entirety:

The Crossroads

Little public analysis has been devoted to options realistically available to Vladimir Putin in response to the massacre of schoolchildren in Ossetia. The fact is that the world has been spoiled by looking at the world through the prism of the American media. When President Bush stopped to consider his response to September 11, he had a range of options available only to a nation as unimaginably powerful as the United States of America. Japanese newspapers reported that President Bush was offered the nuclear option immediately after the attack, probably as an extreme in a range that included filing a diplomatic protest on the opposite end of the spectrum, which he rejected, choosing instead to do what no other country could do: take down the state sponsors of terrorism and pursue the terrorists to the four corners of the earth. America's unmatched power allowed President Bush to select the most humane course of war available. No European power, nor all of them put together, could have embarked on such a precise campaign for lack of means. It was a rich man's strategy, a guerre de luxe.

But no one who has seen the rags and hodgepodge of equipment issued to the Russian Special Forces can entertain any illusion that Vladimir Putin can go around launching raids with hi-tech helicopters, or follow around perps with robotic drones before firing, or use satellite-guided bombs to wipe out enemy safe houses that have been seeded with RFID chips. Nor will those detained by Russia gain weight the way detainees have done at the "inhuman" Gitmo prison. That's an American way of war which even Europeans can only regard with envy. The poor must respond with less. When the Nepalese saw the video of their 12 compatriots executed by terrorists in Iraq, they did what you could do with a box of matches: they burned the mosque in Kathmandu. To paraphrase Crosby, Stills and Nash, 'if you can't hit the one you should then hit the one you're with'.

While Russia can do better than a box of matches, the reality is that its poverty and low-tech force structure will make any response that Putin may choose a brutal and largely indiscriminate affair unless it is subsumed into the larger American-led Global War on Terror. The real price of the European vacation from history is its abandonment of the first principle of civilization. Unless there is common justice, there will be vigilante justice.




Thursday, September 02, 2004

HELLO? NOW DO YOU GET IT?

Read this post about the public pronouncements from an ideological leader of the Islamist jihad. Especially read the first parts, where he asks the kidnappers of the French journalists to let them go free, when he concludes:

You might say that the French stance is not an altruistic one and that they have their own political interests that caused them to disagree with the Americans, and I am not going to say that is not true but it is also our goal to turn them against each other to serve our cause so France has a strategic importance for us.

Nuff said. If the French see and hear this admission that they are in fact the puppets of the Islamists and then they still bend over and do whatever these bastards want them to do, France has truly become our enemy.



WE REPORT, YOU DECIDE

I didn't hear Cheney or Miller last night (sorry, tennis has priority in my house, so it was the US Open instead of the RNC -- great match between Federer and Bhagdatis!).

By the way, don't bother reading what the pundits say about their speeches. Read each one in its entirety.



Wednesday, September 01, 2004

FRUSTRATING

It appears the prosecutor is finally throwing in the towel in the Kobe Bryant case.

So, where does Bryant send the bill for the second screwing he got?

This case really does a disservice to those women who were raped and get their entire lives drug into court for no good reason.



IT MAY BE SERIOUS, OR IT MAY BE COMIC RELIEF

Senator Zell Miller will address the Republican Convention tonight. Miller, a life-long Democrat has come out in support of Bush. His address will be worth watching, or at least reading at a later time.

When asked today why there are no longer any conservative Democrats, Miller said:

The Democratic tent has shrunk to the size of a dunce cap. There’s no room for conservatives like me.



IF ONLY . . .

Don't know who Zak is, but in this post on his blog, I think he had the best answer I've heard for countries who still possess cohones and find that one or more of their citizens have been kidnapped in Iraq:

just have any country whose citizen has been kidnapped pledge to send a thousand (or other arbitrarily large number) more troops to Iraq for every individual kidnapped. As each kidnapping made things harder and harder for the kidnappers, and instead resulted in negative publicity for them (in the form of more foreign soldiers in the country because of their actions), I think the game would come to a conclusion really, really quickly.



"MAINSTREAM MEDIA" -- IS IT BECOMING IRRELEVANT

I don't read newspapers. I never watch news on broadcast television stations, only cable outlets. Mostly, I get news from the Internet.

So am I unusual? Or am I the norm? Don't know, but my gut says the norm is getting closer to me.

Glenn Harlan Reynolds thinks so, and in this piece about the rapid evolution of information flow, he suggests:

The media barons should be worried. The real problem is that to succeed in a business, you have to be better than your competitors at giving people what they want or need. The mainstream media needs to ask itself whether it's capable of doing that -- and, if not, how it needs to change.



EATING THEIR OWN

Hmm. When the left starts getting pissed at Kerry, what to make of it?

William Raspberry, liberal columnist for the WaPo, seems a little peeved at Kerry. Why?

Is Kerry acting on advice of his political advisers, or does he really have no important and articulable policy differences with the man he would replace? If the former, it strikes me as questionable advice; if the latter, it suggests a president who would be weak on leadership.
A lot of us will vote for him because he's not W. But, as I say, it may not be enough.


Damn.

But it does look like the Kerry campaign may sense the same thing and appears to be ready to re-shuffle their team.

As one pundit has already said this morning, "Hey, it worked for Howard Dean. Oh, wait, never mind."